The State Department announced yesterday that it would be changing a long-standing policy that controlled how transgender or transsexual individuals changed the gender marker on their passports. The old policy required that such individuals have surgery before they could change the gender marker.

According to the press release on the policy, surgery will no longer be required. The new policy requires that an attending medical physician certify that the applicant has “undergone appropriate clinical treatment for gender transition.” However, regulations regarding exactly what appropriate clinical treatment may be required under the new policy have not yet been disseminated.

The policy does not allow passport officials to ask for additional medical information other than the certification.

Updated: 2:30 P.M. The guidelines are available here.

The medical certification permits a psychiatrist, internist, endocrinologist, gynecologist, or urologist to give certification. The certification must include the physician’s full name, their medical license or certificate number, the issuing state or other jurisdiction of their medical license, the Drug Enforcement Administration (DEA) registration number assigned to the physician, the address and telephone number of the physician, and must contain the following language:

(1) Language stating that he/she is the attending physician for the applicant and that he/she has a doctor/patient relationship with the applicant;

(2) Language stating the applicant has had appropriate clinical treatment for gender transition to the new gender (male or female);

(3) Language stating “I declare under penalty of perjury under the laws of the United States that the forgoing is true and correct”: and

(4) Annotate the application “gender transition” to record the reason for issuing the full validity passport in the new gender.